Tracking Ravenswing

If you’d like to follow along these adventures, come to this page regularly to get the boat’s  up to date position. If we’re out sailing, anyway.

Ravenswing puts out two types of location signals: [1] Iridium Go! satellite pings. [2] AIS-B over the VHF radio waves.  When we’re underway, each system should be putting out a position report every hour or so. When we stop, and want to conserve battery power, we shut the units down and these sites will keep displaying our last reported position.

Method 1:  We ping straight up to the heavens every hour to the iridium global satellite system, and the good people at PredictWind plot our track on this fabulous map:

https://forecast.predictwind.com/tracking/display/Ravenswing?mapMode=useGoogle&windSymbol=WindStreamlines&weatherSource=ECMWF

Sometimes the Iridium tracking will show us on land… that’s because the satellite transponder doesn’t always live on the boat – it serves for land adventures too.

This is the best way to keep up with the boat. You can see where we’ve gone each hour simply by coming back to this page.  Enjoy!

 

Method 2:  Ravenswing emits a commercial-style AIS signal via VHF that is usually picked up by a satellite network, then fed in to numerous world-wide databases. So you can use any of the ship-tracking websites to see where we are and what other boats/ships are nearby. Do a web search on AIS ship tracking, pick out a website, and enter the name S/V (sailing vessel) Ravenswing, and our MMSI # 368065160.

Here’s one example (but sometimes they want you to pay for their service :(

https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/details/ships/shipid:5986719/mmsi:368065160/imo:0/vessel:RAVENSWING

Family members of our crew – DO NOT FREAK OUT if the AIS system does not show us. It’s all based on whether the satellites can pick up our signal which is intended to go ship to ship, not towards space. So it doesn’t always work, but we’re still fine. You’ll get a call from the Coast Guard if we’re actually in trouble.

 

 

 

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Tribute to a good sailor

My stepmom Valda went to grade school with Rick Holway. Our families did summer activities together for decades. Rick was always an avid sailor, including a hot little catamaran in SoCal a long time ago. He moved through getting-bigger boats, eventually commissioning a new Newport 33 which he campaigned for many years as a single-hander on the ocean out of San Francisco. In my 40’s, having taken ownership of F27 Origami, I asked Rick for the mentorship needed to become a proficient singlehander in the challenging Gulf of the Farallones, the 30 mile stretch from the Golden Gate Bridge out on to the deep water of the Pacific. Rick’s coaching included evening chats, time studying boat safety gear at the dock, and plenty of sailing together. I “graduated” with a successful Singlehanded Farallones race, circa 2009 or so.

Recently Rick called to say he and Gail are leaving the Bay Area, moving near one of their sons down south. With Ravenswing far away, I asked skipper Rick Waltonsmith if he’d take us out for one more sail in RickH’s beloved stomping grounds. On September 11, we had a successful outing:

And OK, we really like sailing on that big tri Round Midnight. But, in early October, it was FINALLY TIME to launch Ravenswing again. Anton and I flew to Phoenix and took a shuttle van across the border and on down to Puerto Penasco. After two more days of minor work logistics, the big Travelift at Cabrales set her afloat again. WHAT A RELIEF!

We set sail on a Friday, and made a 435 mile trip with a good tailwind down to Puerto Escondido, the harbor near Loreto, Baja. I’m busy making some video for you now, to show the good time had by all. Stay tuned.

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  3. one post, two videos Leave a reply
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